4th Annual Educators' Institute

Mississauga, Ontario
Tuesday, August-22-17

Please note that French registration options can be found here. If you wish to attend any French workshops, please email Mercia Antsaniavo at Mercia@ldao.ca

Select registrant type:
Delegate
DAY 1: August 22
 


Opening Keynote

Beyond “Lazy and Unmotivated”, Why Educators Need to Know about Executive Skills

Dr. Peg Dawson, Psychologist, Centre for Learning and Attention Disorders, Seacoast Mental Health Center


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Opening Keynote: Beyond “Lazy and Unmotivated”, Why Teachers Need to Know about Executive Skills

Dr. Peg Dawson, Psychologist, Centre for Learning and Attention Disorders, Seacoast Mental Health Center

When the conversation turns to executive skills, teachers and parents often say, “We didn’t know anything about these when we were growing up—and we turned out just fine.” In this keynote, Dr. Dawson confronts that sentiment head on. The co-author of Smart but Scattered and other books on executive skills explains the executive skills framework she’s been working with for over 20 years—why it’s a better way to describe struggling students than calling them lazy or unmotivated, and why the more teachers understand about these skills, the better they’ll be able to help students strengthen these important habits of mind. She will paint a picture of the strategies she sees as holding the most promise for helping students of all ages develop, tune up, and master these critical life skills.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 8:45 AM - 10:00 AM (Eastern Time)


E.1.1 Strategies for Strengthening Organization

Janet Manhire, Learning Support Consultant and Itinerant Teacher for Learning Disabilities, Ottawa Carleton District School Board
Michelle MacIsaac, Speech-Language Pathologist, Ottawa Carleton District School Board




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E.1.1 Strategies for Strengthening Organization

Janet Manhire, Learning Support Consultant and Itinerant Teacher for Learning Disabilities, Ottawa Carleton District School Board
Michelle MacIsaac, Speech-Language Pathologist, Ottawa Carleton District School Board

Grade Level Focus: primary, junior, intermediate, senior
Intended Audience: teachers, principals, superintendents, parents, speech-language pathologists, educational assistants, early childhood educators
Level of Knowledge: introductory, intermediate (participants should have a basic knowledge of executive functioning skills)

Keeping track of materials needed to do schoolwork, understanding information, following directions, organizing thoughts, setting priorities, making plans, and sticking to a task and getting it done, are things students are required to do all day, every day. Students who have learning disabilities and weak executive functioning skills often struggle with many of these tasks, as evidenced by their arriving to class without the materials they need, missing deadlines, losing assignments they have completed, providing off-topic or disorganized written and oral responses, or difficulty identifying relevant information for solving problems. Well-developed organizational skills are required to accomplish any of these tasks. 

The deeper our understanding of the students’ learning strengths, the nature of the student’s learning disabilities, and the specific root causes for lagging organizational skills, the better able we will be to select effective teaching strategies for strengthening their organizational skills. In this session, we will present a model for identifying possible root causes of poor organization and lagging subskills. We will link this to a selection of strategies that address these possible underlying root causes and student learning strengths.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 10:20 AM - 11:35 AM (Eastern Time)


E.1.2 Closing the Gap for Those who Learn Differently: GECDSB’s Journey of Discovery and Intervention: A Multifaceted Approach

Lynn McLaughlin, Superintendent of Special Education Services, Greater Essex County District School Board
Mike Wilcox, Principal of Special Education Services, Greater Essex County District School Board
Laura Dunn, Educational Coordinator, Greater Essex County District School Board



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E.1.2 Closing the Gap for Those who Learn Differently: GECDSB’s Journey of Discovery and Intervention: A Multifaceted Approach

Lynn McLaughlin, Superintendent of Special Education Services, Greater Essex County District School Board
Mike Wilcox, Principal of Special Education Services, Greater Essex County District School Board
Laura Dunn, Educational Coordinator, Greater Essex County District School Board

Grade Level Focus: elementary
Intended Audience: teachers, administrators, and supervisory officers, students, professional services staff, educational support staff
Level of Knowledge: intermediate

Given the fact that approximately 50% of students with IEPs have a Learning Disability, GECDSB created a steering committee specific to LD. The committee includes teachers, psychologists, speech and language pathologists, administrators, educational coordinators and a representative from the local learning disabilities association.  The committee is now in its third year. A gap analysis focusing on student achievement and wellbeing was completed using multiple sources of data. This workshop will take you through our journey and our action plan.  The resources that have been created will be shared through this interactive presentation.  

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 10:20 AM - 11:35 AM (Eastern Time)


E.1.3 Overcoming Language Barriers to Math Achievement Using Universal Design Principles

Mike Harding, OCT, M.Ed., Academic Support – Mathematics, Trinity College School

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E.1.3 Overcoming Language Barriers to Math Achievement Using Universal Design Principles

Mike Harding, OCT, M.Ed., Academic Support – Mathematics, Trinity College School

Grade Level Focus: primary, junior, intermediate, senior
Intended Audience: teachers, educational assistants
Level of Knowledge: introductory

In this session, you will have the opportunity to discuss and collaborate on strategies to meet and exceed the language and curricular requirements of mathematics in Ontario. Specifically, participants will select an expectation(s) of their choice from the Ontario Mathematics Curriculum. Then, using a research supported universal design framework (from CAST), consideration will be given to how conversations, observations and products may be skillfully applied to overcome language barriers identified by Newman et. al (2015). Co-operation and collaboration across grades will be highly encouraged as will the production of exemplars that might be adapted for practice. Technology may be readily included; while not explicitly required, it is highly recommended. Participants will leave with electronic copies of the framework used and course expectations adapted from the Ontario curriculum in Excel or Google Sheets format.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 10:20 AM - 11:35 AM (Eastern Time)


E.1.4 Staying Local: Year One Successes and Growing Pains

Carrie Wilson, Intensive Support Placement Class Teacher, Rainbow District School Board
Kelly Stevens, Special Education Assistant, Rainbow District School Board

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E.1.4 Staying Local: Year One Successes and Growing Pains

Carrie Wilson, Intensive Support Placement Class Teacher, Rainbow District School Board
Kelly Stevens, Special Education Assistant, Rainbow District School Board

Grade Level Focus: junior
Intended Audience: teachers, superintendants, principals, consultants
Level of Knowledge: introductory

The Rainbow District School Board has implemented an Intensive Support Placement Class for students with severe learning disabilities. The classroom team will share various strategies, programs, and collaborations that have contributed to its successful year-one implementation. Discover how the team balanced the task of boosting specific areas of academic deficiences within a 21st century learning environment. The presentation will address the development of the following: student voice, self-advocacy skills, social skills, behaviour management, student and parent engagement. Assessment methods and data collection will be shared. Collaborations with community partners and a team approach will be highlighted. The session will include interactive opportunities to engage in sample activities.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 10:20 AM - 11:35 AM (Eastern Time)


E.1.5 Anxiety in Students with LDs: When is it a Disorder and What Can I Do to Help?

Dr. Marjory Phillips C.Psych., Director, Integra Program, Child Development Institute
Sarah Glover MSc. RP, Clinical Supervisor, Integra Program, Child Development Institute

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E.1.5 Anxiety in Students with LDs: When is it a Disorder and What Can I Do to Help?

Dr. Marjory Phillips C.Psych., Director, Integra Program, Child Development Institute
Sarah Glover MSc. RP, Clinical Supervisor, Integra Program, Child Development Institute


Grade Level Focus: primary, junior, intermediate, senior
Intended Audience: all educators
Level of Knowledge: introductory to advanced

Students with LDs have higher rates of anxiety (Nelson & Harwood, 2011) and are two to three times more likely to experience mental health difficulties in comparison to peers (Wilson et al, 2009). However, it can be difficult to identify the severity of anxiety in students with LDs in order to know when to access specialized services.  For example, impairments in memory and attention may reflect anxiety (Eysenck et al, 2007) or Learning Disabilities, or both.  In addition, students with LDs and anxiety may avoid school (Milligan, Badali & Spiriou, 2013), may report greater somatic complaints,  or may demonstrate more negative attitudes towards school (McGovern, Lowe & Hill, 2016), which will compound learning difficulties. 

In this workshop, we will explore the relationship between LDs and anxiety in order to understand the differences between students with Anxiety Disorders and students who are anxious. Through the use of interactive exercises, videotaped material, case examples, and group discussion, we will share practical strategies and tips for supporting students with LDs who experience anxiety.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 10:20 AM - 11:35 AM (Eastern Time)


E.2.1 Utilizing Conversations and Observations to Help Assess Students with Learning Disabilities

Ian Chalmers, Mathematics and Science Teacher, Roy McMurtry School, Peel District School Board

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E.2.1 Utilizing Conversations and Observations to Help Assess Students with Learning Disabilities

Ian Chalmers, Mathematics and Science Teacher, Roy McMurtry School, Peel District School Board

Grade Level Focus: secondary
Intended Audience: teachers, principals
Level of Knowledge: intermediate

The presentation will begin with a brief overview of triangulation, discussing common misconceptions and explaining it from the perspective that conversations and observations are two things that every teacher does, but are now part of the way students can be assessed and evaluated. Participants will be given an opportunity to discuss ways they are already using conversations and observations in their classrooms and how effective these strategies have been. The presentation will introduce the resources and walk through 3‐4 detailed examples of how they can be used. The examples include a few specific to students with LDs and a few that can benefit the whole class (necessary for some, good for all). The presentation will then talk about how the resource can be adapted to specific activities, specific students or specific expectations using the example of a problem solving skills rubric that was created to be used across all classes and to track specific students’ problem solving skills in all subject areas. There will be time for participants to adapt the resource to fit a specific lesson or student of their own, so that they can leave the presentation with a resource ready to be used in their classroom.




Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 12:40 PM - 1:55 PM (Eastern Time)


E.2.2 Successful Transtitions to Post-Secondary: What Students Need to Know

Marie McCarron, Clinical Manager, RARC, Queen’s University 
Dayna Neville, Transitions Program Advisor, RARC Queen’s University
Candice Daiken, Transitions Program Advisor, RARC, Queen’s University

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E.2.2 Successful Transtitions to Post-Secondary: What Students Need to Know

Marie McCarron, Clinical Manager, RARC, Queen’s University 
Dayna Neville, Transitions Program Advisor, RARC Queen’s University
Candice Daiken, Transitions Program Advisor, RARC, Queen’s University


Grade Level Focus: secondary
Intended Audience: educators, administrators, parents
Level of Knowledge: introductory

Transitioning to higher education levels is difficult for all students, but especially those with learning disabilities (LDs). These students often have difficulty meeting their own academic needs and have trouble realizing when and how to ask for the help to which they are entitled. Negative experiences in high school can make it incredibly difficult for students with learning disabilities to achieve in post-secondary school, even though they have the intellectual ability to be successful. 

The On-Line to Success Program (OLTS) and the Successful Transitions Online and Mentoring Program (STOMP) are desgned to help secondary students with LDs, ADHD, ASD, and mental health disorders to transition to post-secondary education. The programs combine both in-person and online components designed to meet the researched outcomes from the Learning Opportunities Task Force (LOTF: 1997-2002).  The OLTS program has been running since 2002, graduating and assessing more than 500 students. The STOMP program was recently initiated out of the observed need that more students were struggling with mental health. The presentation will focus on what we have learned in the programs and what students need to make a successful transition. In addition, the Transition Resource Guide will be highlighted.




Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 12:40 PM - 1:55 PM (Eastern Time)


E.2.3 Curriculum Integrity Matters! 

Cindy Perras, M.Ed. OCT, Educational Consultant, LDAO

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E.2.3 Curriculum Integrity Matters! 

Cindy Perras, M.Ed. OCT, Educational Consultant, LDAO

Grade Level Focus: junior, intermediate
Intended Audience: teachers, consultants, principals
Level of Knowledge: introductory to intermediate

All too often, decisions are made to modify the curricular expectations for students with LDs because they don’t seem to be able to access their age/grade curriculum... but students with LDs are bright and they have the right to access age/grade level curriculum, with the appropriate accommodations. Modifying curriculum may have cumulative and negative long-term implications for students with LDs, especially when they transition to the secondary level.

So do you modify curriculum? Or do you just focus on accommodations? Educators are invited to participate in this session on curriculum integrity: we will discuss the pedagogical underpinnings of the modification vs. accommodation debate, consider if, when, and how to modify the curriculum, and explore the accommodations students with LDs need to access the curriculum and to demonstrate their learning.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 12:40 PM - 1:55 PM (Eastern Time)


E.2.4 School-based Strategies for Promoting Executive Skill Development

Dr. Peg Dawson, Psychologist, Centre for Learning and Attention Disorders, Seacoast Mental Health Center

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E.2.4 School-based Strategies for Promoting Executive Skill Development

Dr. Peg Dawson, Psychologist, Centre for Learning and Attention Disorders, Seacoast Mental Health Center

Grade Level Focus: junior, intermediate
Intended Audience: teachers, consultants, principals
Level of Knowledge: introductory to intermediate

This workshop will present a variety of intervention strategies to promote executive skill development. These will include classroom and whole school strategies designed to improve executive skills in all students as well as small group strategies. A framework for designing individualized interventions for students with more significant executive skill weaknesses will also be presented. 




Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 12:40 PM - 1:55 PM (Eastern Time)


E.2.5 Supporting Students in Mathematics Through the Use of a Visual Model

Cristina Corbett, teacher at St. Paul School, Northeastern Catholic DSB
Elizabeth Mulholland, teacher at O’Gorman Intermediate Catholic School, Northeastern Catholic DSB

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E.2.5 Supporting Students in Mathematics Through the Use of a Visual Model

Cristina Corbett, teacher at St. Paul School, Northeastern Catholic DSB
Elizabeth Mulholland, teacher at O’Gorman Intermediate Catholic School, Northeastern Catholic DSB

Grade Level Focus: junior, intermediate
Intended Audience: teachers
Level of Knowledge: introductory to intermediate

A picture is worth a thousand words and, as such, visualisation in mathematics is the key to unlocking conceptual understanding for students. The use of visual representations is a powerful tool in problem solving. Choosing the right visual (diagram or manipulative) can help students understand and explain the mathematics in deep and meaningful ways. While good for all students, this approach is particularly helpful to students with special education needs. Students with learning disabilities (LDs) in math are supported by the use of visual representations to accommodate their learning needs, based on their individual profiles. The instruction on how to choose and use a meaningful representation helps students with LDs to hold and convey their mathematical thinking, or to think more deeply about a concept.  

In this session, participants will explore various visual representations that can be used with all students. Tapping into multimodal representations allows students to make meaningful mathematical connections and see relationships. We will also explore how we can guide students to choose the most appropriate and most effective representation as it pertains to the problem. This session is based on the work of Jo Boaler, Sherry Parrish, Mike Flynn and others, as well as Edugains resources.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 12:40 PM - 1:55 PM (Eastern Time)


E.3.1 Guidelines for the Assessment and Diagnosis of LDs

Maria Kokai Ph.D. C.Psych., Chief Psychologist, Toronto Catholic District School Board
Jack Kamrad Ph.D. C.Psych., Chief Psychologist, Peel District School Board

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E.3.1 Guidelines for the Assessment and Diagnosis of LDs

Maria Kokai Ph.D. C.Psych., Chief Psychologist, Toronto Catholic District School Board
Jack Kamrad Ph.D. C.Psych., Chief Psychologist, Peel District School Board

Grade Level Focus: elementary and secondary
Intended Audience: teachers, principals, superintendents, psychologists and other school professionals
Level of Knowledge: intermediate to advanced

The Association of Chief Psychologists with Ontario School Boards, in order to ensure alignment between school boards across the province in how their school psychology service providers are assessing and diagnosing learning disabilities (LDs), created a set of guidelines which are applied in school boards that have representation in the association. The goal of these common guidelines is to ensure consistency in LD assessment and diagnosis, making assessment reports easily transferable, thus making transitions easier for students when they transfer from one board to another. This presentation aims to familiarize educators and other school professionals with the key components of these guidelines to aid the interpretation of psychological assessment reports.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 2:15 PM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)


E.3.2 Overview of the EmpowerTM Pilot Study for the Ministry of Education of Ontario

Dr. Rhonda Martinussen, Associate Professor, Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development & Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

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E.3.2 Overview of the Empower (TM) Pilot Study for the Ministry of Education of Ontario

Dr. Rhonda Martinussen, Associate Professor, Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development & Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Grade Level Focus: primary/junior
Intended Audience: teachers, special education teachers, principals
Level of Knowledge: introductory to intermediate

The Empower (TM) Pilot Project is funded by the Ministry of Education of Ontario and is currently underway in eight school boards. The goal of the Ministry of Education is to draw on the experiences and knowledge acquisition of the pilot boards to learn more about how to effectively support students with learning diabilities in reading. In this presentation, participants will be provided with an overview of the EmpowerTM Pilot Project’s overall aim and approach as well as some preliminary information from the team’s research activities this past year as they began their efforts to understand how the pilots are working and adapting to each context. Participants will be provided with a brief description of EmpowerTM as well as highlight the other elements of the pilot project and their importance to understanding how to support students with LDs in reading in the classroom. Part of the study includes gathering student perspectives through interviews about their experiences, and participants will be able to learn about the early analyses of these student perspectives on their experiences this past year.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 2:15 PM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)


E.3.3 High-Yield Instructional Strategies in Mathematics

Andrew Brown, Special Education Teacher, Sagonaska Demonstration School, Provincial Schools Board, seconded from Hastings Prince Edward District School Board
Jeff Richardson, Special Education Teacher, Sagonaska Demonstration School, Provincial Schools Board, seconded from Hastings Prince Edward District School Board

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E.3.3 High-Yield Instructional Strategies in Mathematics

Andrew Brown, Special Education Teacher, Sagonaska Demonstration School, Provincial Schools Board, seconded from Hastings Prince Edward District School Board
Jeff Richardson, Special Education Teacher, Sagonaska Demonstration School, Provincial Schools Board, seconded from Hastings Prince Edward District School Board


Grade Level Focus: junior, intermediate, senior
Intended Audience: classroom teachers, special education teachers, coordinators/ consultants, principals
Level of Knowledge: introductory to intermediate

Students with LDs often struggle in math. Fortunately, there are strategies that benefit learners with LDs that also make learning math more accessible to all students. Students with LDs often have deficits in working memory and processing speed, and struggle with attaching meaning to the symbols used in traditional, paper-pencil math instruction. Students with memory issues have difficulty remembering procedures, especially if they have not first developed a conceptual understanding of the math, and also struggle to keep track of numbers as they work through a problem. Most struggle with representing their thinking following traditional algorithms. 
This workshop will model strategies to address these issues including:
  • how the mathematical processes can provide a framework for instruction and monitoring growth across all strands;
  • the use of manipulatives to develop conceptual understanding before introducing or co-developing procedures; and
  • low-prep use of technology to capture student learning and for assessment.
Participants will solve problems using concrete materials and discuss the merits of different instructional strategies in today’s 21st century classroom.

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 2:15 PM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)


E.3.4 Preventing Reading Failure using RTI: Putting Science to Work in the Classroom

Dr. Erin M. Picard, Chief Psychologist, Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board

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E.3.4 Preventing Reading Failure using RTI: Putting Science to Work in the Classroom

Dr. Erin M. Picard, Chief Psychologist, Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board

Grade Level Focus: primary, junior
Intended Audience: teachers, administrators, psychologists
Level of Knowledge: some knowledge of RTI and reading intervention

When the Ontario Psychological Association (OPA) student assessment project was implemented in 2007, the WECDSB, like many boards within the province, had been experiencing a backlog of referrals for psychological assessment. The WECDSB plan targeted early intervention/prevention programming in reading, as this was identified by the research and experts consulted as the only viable means to decrease the burden and costs associated with lengthy waitlists. Fast forward 9 years and the lessons learned have been invaluable. Year one data indicated that the number of students struggling in reading could be reduced by 70% using systematic and explicit phonics instruction. This data highlight the cost of not acting early on using a classroom based Tier 1 intervention. 

The PALS reading program has become the cornerstone of a broader system emphasis on early intervention and prevention. Tied to this programming is the use of Curriculum Based Measurement tools to guide instructional decision making. These are quick and easy-to-administer probes that do not take away from valuable instruction/intervention time. Comparisons will be made between these formative assessment tools and the more traditional and time consuming summative tools. Samples of these and targets developed will be shared.


Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 2:15 PM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)


E.3.5 Beyond Extra Time: Leading the Implementation of Universal Design for Learning and Differentiated Instruction

Jenessa Dworet, Special Education Assistant Curriculum Leader at York Mills Collegiate Institute, Toronto District School Board
Chris Sands, Special Education Assistant Curriculum Leader at ir John A. MacDonald Collegiate Institute, Toronto District School Board
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E.3.5 Beyond Extra Time: Leading the Implementation of Universal Design for Learning and Differentiated Instruction

Jenessa Dworet, Special Education Assistant Curriculum Leader at York Mills Collegiate Institute, Toronto District School Board
Chris Sands, Special Education Assistant Curriculum Leader at Sir John A. MacDonald Collegiate Institute, Toronto District School Board


Grade Level Focus: intermediate, senior
Intended Audience: teachers, principals, consultants/coordinators, superintendants
Level of Knowledge: intermediate

The Ontario Ministry of Education, through Policy/Program Memorandum No. 8, expects the provision of “personalized, precise, explicit, and intensive” assessment and instruction for students with learning disabilities or who require more support in order to be successful in school. Many teachers and support staff are at a beginning level of understanding about how to accommodate or modify their teaching to meet the needs of their learners. The Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation, understands that “PPM8 speaks to the importance of… member-directed PD and training.”
 
This workshop is for staff who will be encouraging, coaching, and training their colleagues in strategies that reach every student. Using case studies and experiences from the front lines, two experienced educators will move beyond simply listing accommodations for the classroom, and engage participants in the process of leading the school-wide implementation of Universal Design for Learning and Differentiated Instruction. This session will support educators in returning to their schools or districts, and in moving their peers to meet the Ministry’s vision in which “high-quality, evidence-based assessment and instruction are systematically provided and respond to an individual student’s strengths and needs.”

Add to calendarTuesday, August-22-17 2:15 PM - 3:30 PM (Eastern Time)


DAY 2: August 23
 


TalkLD Live


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TalkLD Live

Join our CEO and your host Lawrence Barns as we record a session of TalkLD Live with an audience for the very first time!

Lawrence is a lawyer by training and a parent of two boys with LDs. He is never afraid to ask the tough questions of those who enter his studio.
 
The very special guest(s) will be announced shortly, but trust us, this will start day two of the event with a bang and provoke your thinking for a long time afterwards, as we tackle core issues facing Ontario educators and their students with LDs today!

 


Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM (Eastern Time)


E.4.1 The Renewed Mathematics Strategy

Zheng Xu, Education Officer, Special Education Policy and Programs Branch, Ontario Ministry of Education
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E.4.1 The Renewed Mathematics Strategy

Zheng Xu, Education Officer, Special Education Policy and Programs Branch, Ontario Ministry of Education

Grade Level Focus: elementary, secondary
Intended Audience: all educators
Level of Knowledge: introductory

This session is designed to share information and updates about the Renewed Mathematics Strategy (RMS). To support the implementation of RMS in 2016-17, the Ministry of Education has provided focused, responsive and differentiated professional learning opportunities to strengthen mathematics learning, teaching and leading across Ontario for students with special education needs, particularly for students with learning disabilities. Participants will also be invited to share their experiences and learning at individual, school and/or system levels.


Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM (Eastern Time)


E.4.2 Understanding Attention and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Problems in the Classroom: Strategies for Success 

Dr. Sue Ball, Ph.D. C. Psych., Coordinator of Psychological Services, York Region District School Board
Lynn Ziraldo, Strategic Advisor, LDAYR  (details)

E.4.2 Understanding Attention and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity Problems in the Classroom: Strategies for Success 

Dr. Sue Ball, Ph.D. C. Psych., Coordinator of Psychological Services, York Region District School Board
Lynn Ziraldo, Strategic Advisor, LDAYR

Grade Level Focus: intermediate
Intended Audience: teachers, principals, superintendants, students
Level of Knowledge: introductory

This presentation will document the impact of attention and hyeractivity/impulsivity on learning for all students and particularly for students with learning disabilities (LDs). We will highlight practical strategies for supporting students across the tiers as well as showcase a student profile with student voice and advocacy card. Participants will learn about the significant implications impacting on understanding of lifelong learning, student resilience and well-being. We would like participants to recognize the impact of attention, hyperactivity/impulsivity problems on learning, the value and importance of student voice and self-advocacy, and the importance of strategies to support learning, achievement and well-being for all students, but particularly for students with LDs.

Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM (Eastern Time)


E.4.3 Battle of the SEA Devices: iPad VS Laptop

Cynthia Gozzard, Learning Resource Teacher, Delhi Public School, Grand Erie District School Board
Joe Archer, Grade 3 Teacher, Hagersville Elementary, Grand Erie District School Board

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E.4.3 Battle of the SEA Devices: iPad VS Laptop

Cynthia Gozzard, Learning Resource Teacher, Delhi Public School, Grand Erie District School Board
Joe Archer, Grade 3 Teacher, Hagersville Elementary, Grand Erie District School Board

Grade Level Focus: elementary
Intended Audience: classroom teachers, special education teachers, department support
Level of Knowledge: introductory

Choosing the right device to support an elementary student may be as important as choosing the correct instructional strategies to teach a student with learning disabilities (LDs).

This presentation aims to break down a variety of learning profiles of students who have LDs to discuss which devices may best match learning needs. The implementation of BYOD has brought a number of different devices to our classrooms, each one offering unique accessibility features. Word prediction and text-to-speech may be assistive technology supports that can support students; however, each one of these tools works differently, depending on the device they are used on. 

Presenters will model the use of these assistive technologies as well as provide student-generated examples and testimonials. Participants in the session will be provided with ready-to-use checklists and student profile sheets that may help to make the best choice, when it comes to selecting a device. To maximize learning in the classroom, students with LDs need Individualized Education Plans that are tailored specifically to develop their strengths and support their weaknesses. Join us to discuss the variety of devices found in 21st century classrooms and see which device may be best, depending on the student learning profile.


Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM (Eastern Time)


E.4.4 Planning and Implementing Effective Literacy Interventions Based on CBM Data: A Tiered Approach to Introduction in the Inclusive Classroom  

*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who register for E.4.4 must also register for E.5.4.

Dr. Todd Cunningham C.Psych., Clinical and School Psychologist at OISE/University of Toronto
Julia Ferrari Ph.D, OCT, Literacy Development Project Manager at Learn Different and Sessional Lecturer at OISE/University of Toronto
 (details)
E.4.4 Planning and Implementing Effective Literacy Interventions Based on CBM Data: A Tiered Approach to Introduction in the Inclusive Classroom  

*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who register for E.4.4 must also register for E.5.4.

Dr. Todd Cunningham C.Psych., Clinical and School Psychologist at OISE/University of Toronto
Julia Ferrari Ph.D, OCT, Literacy Development Project Manager at Learn Different and Sessional Lecturer at OISE/University of Toronto


Grade Level Focus: primary, junior
Intended Audience: teachers
Level of Knowledge: introductory, intermediate

Identifying and monitoring students at-risk for literacy difficulties is critical in the inclusive classroom. Curriculum-based measures (CBM) are empirically validated tools that educators can use for this purpose. In addition to identifying students at-risk of reading failure, CBMs help educators, working with students in kindergarten to grade 6, to evaluate the academic skill level of all students in their class. Using the approach outlined in this workshop, educators will develop the necessary skills to make on-going instructional decisions for their at-risk students, based on data collected from CBMs, while providing evidence-based Tier 1 instruction for all students in the class. Tier 1 and Tier 2 instructional strategies, using a balanced literacy framework, will be demonstrated. 
In order to illustrate the key concepts in this workshop, we will use a problem-based learning approach involving case studies. Participants will work in groups to determine how to adapt interventions based on benchmark and progress monitoring data in order to foster student growth. This workshop will empower educators to provide more effective and targeted instruction to all their students especially those who need it most.

Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM (Eastern Time)


E.4.5 Closing the Reading Gap for Learners of All Ages

*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who register for E.4.5 must also register for E.5.5.

Dr. Donald Shattuck, Psychologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Dr. Mary-Ellen Thompson, Speech-Language Pathologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Martin Smit, Principal, Sagonaska Demonstration School
    (details)
E.4.5 Closing the Reading Gap for Learners of All Ages

*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who register for E.4.5 must also register for E.5.5.

Dr. Donald Shattuck, Psychologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Dr. Mary-Ellen Thompson, Speech-Language Pathologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Martin Smit, Principal, Sagonaska Demonstration School


Grade Level Focus: elementary, secondary
Intended Audience: teachers, principals, superintendents
Level of Knowledge: introductory to advanced

Accommodations and assistive technology are the typical supports for students with Learning Disabilities (LDs) in Ontario schools. Unfortunately these supports do not always facilitate closing the reading gap in these students. Sagonaska Provincial Demonstration School teaches reading to students with the most severe LDs in the province. During the last four years we have seen our reading results nearly double.  Students who stay with us for two years are experiencing an average gain of nearly five academic years in reading. In this session, we will explain how our staff is able to accelerate the reading development of our students.  

Part 1 of this session will focus on the essential components of the reading process from the perspective of psychology, speech-language pathology and education. The goal is for participants to better understand what specific skills need to be developed in students with LDs for reading to advance.


Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM (Eastern Time)


E.5.1 A Collaborative Approach to Building Teacher Capacity in Supporting Students with LDs in the Mathematics Classroom

Marci Damen, Learning Coordinator for Special Education, Thames Valley District School Board
Karen Doupe, Learning Coordinator for Mathematics K-8, Thames Valley District School Board

 (details)
E.5.1 A Collaborative Approach to Building Teacher Capacity in Supporting Students with LDs in the Mathematics Classroom

Marci Damen, Learning Coordinator for Special Education, Thames Valley District School Board
Karen Doupe, Learning Coordinator for Mathematics K-8, Thames Valley District School Board


Grade Level Focus: junior
Intended Audience: teachers, systems leaders
Level of Knowledge: introductory

This session will outline a collaborative project initiated in an effort to increase teacher understanding of appropriate learning goals and expectations in mathematics, for students with learning disabilities (LDs).  Using the Teaching and Learning Cycle and W Model as the foundation, this project leads teachers on a collaborative journey with administrators, special education resource teachers (SERTs), instructional coaches and learning disabilities itinerant teachers, to understand individual student strengths as well as the impact that cognitive processes can have on mathematical thinking and learning. Not only did classroom teachers and SERTs build pedagogical content knowledge in teaching mathematics, they also increased their understanding of the profile of students with LDs, leading to more personalized Individual Education Plans for their students. The foundation of this project aligned with the Renewed Mathematics Strategy focus on supporting students with LDs in the mathematics classroom.


Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 12:05 PM - 1:20 PM (Eastern Time)


E.5.2 The Itinerant LD Team: A Comprehensive Look at Accommodations for Students   

Barbara Williams, Special Education Consultant/Program Leader for Learning Disabilities, Waterloo Region District School Board  (details)
E.5.2 The Itinerant LD Team: A Comprehensive Look at Accommodations for Students   

Barbara Williams, Special Education Consultant/Program Leader for Learning Disabilities, Waterloo Region District School Board

Grade Level Focus: elementary, secondary
Intended Audience: teachers, SERTs, consultants, psychologists, administrators
Level of Knowledge: introductory to advanced

This session will provide a comprehensive overview of tiered supports for students with Learning Disabilities (LDs). Practical suggestions, resources, and programming considerations will be presented based on the work of the itinerant LD team in WRDSB. An accomplished team of educators work collaboratively to meet the varied needs of students at primary, junior, intermediate, and senior levels. Reflecting on a decade of service via an itinerant model, this session will describe, in more detail, supports and resources in the areas of:
  • Numeracy strategies (RMS)
  • Literacy strategies
  • Referral process, screening and identification
  • Differentiated instruction & accommodations
  • Understanding student profile, IEP consultation
  • Technology (GAFE)
  • Executive functioning
  • Self-advocacy, social skills, self-esteem
  • Transition to intermediate/secondary


Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 12:05 PM - 1:20 PM (Eastern Time)


E.5.3 Teaching Written Language to Students with Learning Disabilities 101

Chris Samis, Superintendent of Special Education, Simcoe County District School Board


 (details)
E.5.3 Teaching Written Language to Students with Learning Disabilities 101

Chris Samis, Superintendent of Special Education, Simcoe County District School Board

Grade Level Focus: primary, junior, intermediate
Intended Audience: teachers, principals, superintendents
Level of Knowledge: intermediate

Students spend nearly 60% of their school day actively engaged in the process of writing; therefore, the importance of being able to translate thought into written language is critical to success at school. The ability to organize thought into symbolic representation (writing) continues to be a central barometer of success in education. That said, arguably no other task represents a bigger challenge to educators than providing written language instruction and/or remediation to students with learning disabilities.

This learning session will provide participants with an introduction to the sub-types of written language disabilities (i.e. dyslexia, dysgraphia) as well as how to tailor specific interventions to student need. The session will also include practical instructional strategies to support students in the area of orthography (i.e. spelling, conventions, capitalization etc.) in order to increase opportunities for success.


Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 12:05 PM - 1:20 PM (Eastern Time)


E.5.4 Planning and Implementing Effective Literacy Interventions Based on CBM Data: A Tiered Approach to Introduction in the Inclusive Classroom  

*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who registered for E.4.4 must also register for E.5.4.


Dr. Todd Cunningham C.Psych., Clinical and School Psychologist at OISE/University of Toronto
Julia Ferrari Ph.D, OCT, Literacy Development Project Manager at Learn Different and Sessional Lecturer at OISE/University of Toronto

 (details)
E.5.4 Planning and Implementing Effective Literacy Interventions Based on CBM Data: A Tiered Approach to Introduction in the Inclusive Classroom  

*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who registered for E.4.4 must also register for E.5.4.

Dr. Todd Cunningham C.Psych., Clinical and School Psychologist at OISE/University of Toronto
Julia Ferrari Ph.D, OCT, Literacy Development Project Manager at Learn Different and Sessional Lecturer at OISE/University of Toronto


Grade Level Focus: primary, junior
Intended Audience: teachers
Level of Knowledge: introductory, intermediate

Please see the description for session E.4.4 for more information.



Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 12:05 PM - 1:20 PM (Eastern Time)


E.5.5 Closing the Reading Gap for Learners of All Ages

*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who registered for E.4.5 must also register for E.5.5.

Dr. Donald Shattuck, Psychologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Dr. Mary-Ellen Thompson, Speech-Language Pathologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Martin Smit, Principal, Sagonaska Demonstration School
 (details)
E.5.5 Closing the Reading Gap for Learners of All Ages
*Please note that this is a 2-part session. Delegates who registered for E.4.5 must also register for E.5.5.

Dr. Donald Shattuck, Psychologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Dr. Mary-Ellen Thompson, Speech-Language Pathologist, Sagonaska Demonstration School
Martin Smit, Principal, Sagonaska Demonstration School

Grade Level Focus: elementary, secondary
Intended Audience: teachers, principals, superintendents
Level of Knowledge: introductory to advanced

Part 2 of the session will be more “hands-on” and intended for teachers and schools to put into practice the theory from Part 1. Participants will reflect on the tools they currently have or tools that could be put in place to help accelerate the reading acquisition of students with LDs in their schools.

Please see the description for session E.4.5 for more information.



Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 12:05 PM - 1:20 PM (Eastern Time)


Closing Keynote 

ADHD? Who, me? Myths Busted and Tools That Work


Rick Green, comedy writer, performer, and director
 (details)

Closing Keynote 

ADHD? Who, me? Myths Busted and Tools That Work


Rick Green, comedy writer, performer, and director

Comedian Rick Green’s hilarious story takes us through his childhood struggles, lonely adolescencs, and chaotic show-biz career that unexpectedly turns into a life dedicated to ADHD. Risk takes us into the tornado of emotions that erupted after he was diagnosed in his 40s. What follows is a wild roller coaster of unexpected successes, unforeseen calamities, and a surprising crusade to change how the world sees ADHD.

“First crisis was my own reaction: regret, anger, sadness. Looking back at how I’d struggled in school, in relationships, at work… All that suffering could have been avoided if only I’d known sooner! What could my life have been like?”

“Second crisis was other people’s reactions. The sneering dismissal that I might have ADHD, or even that it was a read disorder. At my lowest, I wished that I’d never found out the truth. And never told anyone else.”
Instead, Rick chose to tell everyone the truth. The comedy writer, director, and producer became a mental health crusader, determined to transform how the world understood and dealt with this disorder.

Rick also discusses the myths associated with ADHD, and strategies that help to live with it. Drawing upon the paradigm for understanding ADHD as an issue with executive functions, Rick identifies the myriad ways the disorder sabotages people, and then offers practical, ADHD-friendly strategies to manage, to master, and to avoid disaster. Rick will touch on areas like productivity, focus, follow-through, priorities, time, energy, and complex tasks. This will be helpful to all educators who have students with ADHD in their classroom.



Add to calendarWednesday, August-23-17 1:40 PM - 3:00 PM (Eastern Time)


 

Contact Information

  • Mercia Antsaniavo
    Email: Mercia@LDAO.ca

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